Curious case of studying culture

I study culture. I am enthusiastic to know how we all live differently or similarly in different frames of understanding our surroundings we are connected. Now that I officially study culture at university, I keep questioning to myself what is the reason to study people and their way of understanding the world. My own purpose was always clear; I work in development and I can only do my work by understanding how people understand their surroundings. But perhaps often inevitably, I face the conflict between my pleasure and the justification for the pleasure.

I study culture. I am enthusiastic to know how we all live differently or similarly in different frames of understanding our surroundings we are connected. Although the ‘culture’ was not what I told myself that I liked to know. I just gave it a name ‘culture’ because it sounded most suitable within my language limitation. Now that I officially study culture at university, I keep questioning to myself what is the reason to study people and their way of understanding the world. My own purpose was always clear; I work in development and I can only do my work by understanding how people understand their surroundings. But perhaps often inevitably, I face the conflict between my pleasure and the justification for the pleasure.
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Intercultural dialogue: Ethnography of dynamic, hegemony, and differentiation

In contemporary societies, especially in the post-colonial context, performing as well as proving inclusiveness in regard to gender, race, ethnicity, and religion has become a potent means of sustaining public support and offering rationale. Subsequently, the term “cultural diversity” has gained great significance, yet without the clarification of the meaning and its latent representations. The following research objectives and literature review shed the light on how dialogue participants perceive and use the term diversity, and what roles does the articulation of difference play in shaping dynamics and intercultural dialogues.

Intercultural dialogue: Ethnography of dynamic, hegemony, and differentiation

This article is part of my ethnographic research proposal exercise on intercultural dialogue. There is plenty of space for improvement but I will leave it as it is for now and come back later for more development.
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Aren’t we appropriating music?

You can’t believe how much I love looking appropriate. Especially when it comes to listening to music. I appropriate to impress.

While I was working on office party planning ahead of Christmas day, I decided to buy a set of speaker so that we music lovers can listen to music as loud as our sing-along noise. A few days later, I set up the new speaker on my desk for a test run. Even for a test run, my music selection process isn’t usually quite simple. I consider several factors like emotion, audience, occasion, and so on. This time I chose from my playlists songs that involve bouncy beats such as dancehall and reggaeton that give African-y vibes.

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Different language, different personality

Why do I behave differently in different languages? I can be amusing in one language but I can be more submissive in another. It is the experience that mirrors my behaviour when using certain language, or the culture blended in the language for that matter. Experience depending on the choice of language can differ significantly in my case. It conceives different social norms as well as varying range of acceptable boundaries.

A few days ago I was talking to my friend how I’m frustrated by not being able to amuse people in my native language. I’ve been more frequently questioning myself if I’m a boring person or if I don’t enjoy talking within a certain cultural code, i.e., Korean. Sometimes more than often I find myself struggling in talking to people not to mention finding them uninteresting. I don’t dislike the culture that I was brought in, in fact, I don’t have any preference in any type of culture that bounds one’s personality into social consistency.
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